Tag Archives: Oregon

Oregon Cannabis Association

The Oregon Cannabis Association is the only statewide organization devoted to protecting and promoting the interests of the Oregon cannabis industry at the local, state and federal level.

Source: Oregon Cannabis Association



Oregon lawmakers introduce legislation to protect legal recreational marijuana | OregonLive.com

On Thursday, Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) and Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-Ore.) announced a legislative package they said will “preserve the integrity of state marijuana laws and provide a path for responsible federal legalization and regulation of the marijuana industry.”

Source: Oregon lawmakers introduce legislation to protect legal recreational marijuana | OregonLive.com



Oregon: Marijuana Legalization/Regulation Will Be On November Ballot | Hemp News

Oregon: Marijuana Legalization/Regulation Will Be On November Ballot | Hemp News.

Medical marijuana in Oregon: House committee approves bill that allows communities to ban dispensaries | OregonLive.com

Medical marijuana in Oregon: House committee approves bill that allows communities to ban dispensaries | OregonLive.com.

Oregon Hemp Works

Oregon Hemp Works.

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Five Zero Trees

Five Zero Trees is a well known Portland medical cannabis brand turned OMMP Resource Center. We are activists with a true passion for cannabis medicine. Our values and knowledge exceed the competition. Five Zero Trees is a place for OMMP Patients to recieve high quality medicine in a comfortable and safe environment. We have believed in the revolution of alternative medicine for 20+ years and have a strong desire to help the OMMP community flurish for many years to come.

10209 SE DIVISON ST
Building B
PORTLAND, OR
97266

Tel: 971-242-8492

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Election 2013: Landslide Victory For Legal Marijuana in Portland, Maine, 3 Michigan Cities « House Of Dabs

Looks like recent polls showing a clear majority of Americans in favor of legalizing marijuana has played out that way in Portland, Maine,  and three Michigan cities where voters overwhelmingly approved legalizing possession of marijuana.

That city’s initiative of the voters legalizes …

“… the recreational use of marijuana by adults 21 years of age or older. It allows adults 21 years of age or older to legally possess up to 2.5 ounces of marijuana and paraphernalia. It also allows adults 21 years of age or older to engage in activities for the purpose of ascertaining the possession of marijuana and paraphernalia. It prohibits recreational use activities in public spaces, school grounds …”

The Portland Press Herald is reporting that 70 percent of voters have approved the measure. And, while there are more votes to come in, the lead has proponents declaring victory.

These are not the big tests of legalized and taxed recreational markets that will come up for votes in several states, primarily Alaska and Oregon, in 2014, and many others in 2016. But the votes are a test of public willingness all the same.

Voters in three Michigan cities – Lansing, Jackson and Ferndale – all approved the legalization of the use or possession of up to an ounce of marijuana on private property by anyone 21 years or older.

Nearly 63 percent of Lansing residents voted to amend the city’s charter to legalize the possession, use and transfer of an ounce of marijuana, reported Mlive.com.

Jackson passed a similar ordinance by 60 percent and Ferndale passed one as well by 69 percent of the vote,the site reported.

“There are now 14 cities in the state of Michigan that passed similar ordinance, and we hope this will send a message to politicians,” marijuana proponent Roger Maufort told the news site. “We’re very excited.”

Election 2013: Landslide Victory For Legal Marijuana in Portland, Maine, 3 Michigan Cities « House Of Dabs House Of Dabs.


These are the Marijuana laws of the Pacific Crest Trail – PCT Team Green 2014

PCT Team Green 2014PCT Team Green 2014

These are the Marijuana laws of the Pacific Crest Trail

California
Ballot Proposition 215 (45 KB) — Approved Nov. 5, 1996 by 56% of voters
Effective: Nov. 6, 1996
Removes state-level criminal penalties on the use, possession and cultivation of marijuana by patients who possess a “written or oral recommendation” from their physician that he or she “would benefit from medical marijuana.” Patients diagnosed with any debilitating illness where the medical use of marijuana has been “deemed appropriate and has been recommended by a physician” are afforded legal protection under this act.
Approved Conditions: AIDS, anorexia, arthritis, cachexia, cancer, chronic pain, glaucoma, migraine, persistent muscle spasms, including spasms associated with multiple sclerosis, seizures, including seizures associated with epilepsy, severe nausea; Other chronic or persistent medical symptoms.
Amended: Senate Bill 420 (70 KB)
Effective: Jan. 1, 2004
Imposes statewide guidelines outlining how much medicinal marijuana patients may grow and possess.
Possession/Cultivation: Qualified patients and their primary caregivers may possess no more than eight ounces of dried marijuana and/or six mature (or 12 immature) marijuana plants. However, S.B. 420 allows patients to possess larger amounts of marijuana when recommended by a physician. The legislation also allows counties and municipalities to approve and/or maintain local ordinances permitting patients to possess larger quantities of medicinal pot than allowed under the new state guidelines.
S.B. 420 also grants implied legal protection to the state’s medicinal marijuana dispensaries, stating, “Qualified patients, persons with valid identification cards, and the designated primary caregivers of qualified patients … who associate within the state of California in order collectively or cooperatively to cultivate marijuana for medical purposes, shall not solely on the basis of that fact be subject to state criminal sanctions.”

4: [Editor’s Note: On Jan. 21, 2010, the California Supreme Court affirmed (S164830 (300 KB)) the May 22, 2008 Second District Court of Appeals ruling (50 KB) in the Kelly Case that the possession limits set by SB 420 violate the California constitution because the voter-approved Prop. 215 can only be amended by the voters.

ProCon.org contacted the California Medical Marijuana Program (MMP) on Dec. 6, 2010 to ask 1) how the ruling affected the implementation of the program, and 2) what instructions are given to patients regarding possession limits. A California Department of Public Health (CDPH) Office of Public Affairs representative wrote the following in a Dec. 7, 2010 email to ProCon.org: “The role of MMP under Senate Bill 420 is to implement the State Medical Marijuana ID Card Program in all California counties. CDPH does not oversee the amounts that a patient may possess or grow. When asked what a patient can possess, patients are referred to www.courtinfo.ca.gov, case S164830 which is the Kelly case, changing the amounts a patient can possess from 8 oz, 6 mature plants or 12 immature plants to ‘the amount needed for a patient’s personal use.’ MMP can only cite what the law says.”

According to a Jan. 21, 2010 article titled “California Supreme Court Further Clarifies Medical Marijuana Laws,” by Aaron Smith, California Policy Director at the Marijuana Policy Project, the impact of the ruling is that people growing more than 6 mature or 12 immature plants are still subject to arrest and prosecution, but they will be allowed to use a medical necessity defense in court.]

Attorney General’s Guidelines:
On Aug. 25, 2008, California Attorney General Jerry Brown issued guidelines for law enforcement and medical marijuana patients to clarify the state’s laws. Read more about the guidelines here.

Oregon
Ballot Measure 67 (75 KB) — Approved by 55% of voters on Nov. 3, 1998
Effective: Dec. 3, 1998
Removes state-level criminal penalties on the use, possession and cultivation of marijuana by patients who possess a signed recommendation from their physician stating that marijuana “may mitigate” his or her debilitating symptoms.
Approved Conditions: Cancer, glaucoma, positive status for HIV/AIDS, or treatment for these conditions; A medical condition or treatment for a medical condition that produces cachexia, severe pain, severe nausea, seizures, including seizures caused by epilepsy, or persistent muscle spasms, including spasms caused by multiple sclerosis. Other conditions are subject to approval by the Health Division of the Oregon Department of Human Resources.
Possession/Cultivation: A registry identification cardholder or the designated primary caregiver of the cardholder may possess up to six mature marijuana plants and 24 ounces of usable marijuana. A registry identification cardholder and the designated primary caregiver of the cardholder may possess a combined total of up to 18 marijuana seedlings. (per Oregon Revised Statutes ORS 475.300 — ORS 475.346) (52 KB)
Amended: Senate Bill 1085 (52 KB)
Effective: Jan. 1, 2006
State-qualified patients who possess cannabis in amounts exceeding the new state guidelines will no longer retain the ability to argue an “affirmative defense” of medical necessity at trial. Patients who fail to register with the state, but who possess medical cannabis in amounts compliant with state law, still retain the ability to raise an “affirmative defense” at trial.
The law also redefines “mature plants” to include only those cannabis plants that are more than 12 inches in height and diameter, and establish a state-registry for those authorized to produce medical cannabis to qualified patients.
Amended: House Bill 3052
Effective: July 21, 1999
Mandates that patients (or their caregivers) may only cultivate marijuana in one location, and requires that patients must be diagnosed by their physicians at least 12 months prior to an arrest in order to present an “affirmative defense.” This bill also states that law enforcement officials who seize marijuana from a patient pending trial do not have to keep those plants alive. Last year the Oregon Board of Health approved agitation due to Alzheimer’s disease to the list of debilitating conditions qualifying for legal protection.
In August 2001, program administrators filed established temporary procedures further defining the relationship between physicians and patients. The new rule defines attending physician as “a physician who has established a physician/patient relationship with the patient;… is primarily responsible for the care and treatment of the patients;… has reviewed a patient’s medical records at the patient’s request, has conducted a thorough physical examination of the patient, has provided a treatment plan and/or follow-up care, and has documented these activities in a patient file.”
Amended: SB 281 (25 KB)
Signed by Gov. John Kitzhaber on June 6, 2013
Adds post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) to the list of approved conditions for medical marijuana use.

Amended: HB 3460 (50 KB)
Signed by Gov. John Kitzhaber on Aug. 14, 2013

Creates a dispensary program by allowing the state licensing and regulation of medical marijuana facilities to transfer marijuana to registry identification cardholders or their designated primary caregivers.

[Editor’s Note: On Nov. 2, 2010, 55.79% of Oregon Voters rejected Measure 74 (100 KB), which would have allowed for the creation of state-regulated dispensaries.]

Washington
Chapter 69.51A RCW (4KB) Ballot Initiative I-692 — Approved by 59% of voters on Nov. 3, 1998
Effective: Nov. 3, 1998
Removes state-level criminal penalties on the use, possession and cultivation of marijuana by patients who possess “valid documentation” from their physician affirming that he or she suffers from a debilitating condition and that the “potential benefits of the medical use of marijuana would likely outweigh the health risks.”
Approved Conditions: Cachexia; cancer; HIV or AIDS; epilepsy; glaucoma; intractable pain (defined as pain unrelieved by standard treatment or medications); and multiple sclerosis. Other conditions are subject to approval by the Washington Board of Health.
Possession/Cultivation: Patients (or their primary caregivers) may legally possess or cultivate no more than a 60-day supply of marijuana. The law does not establish a state-run patient registry.
Amended: Senate Bill 6032 (29 KB)
Effective: 2007 (rules being defined by Legislature with a July 1, 2008 due date)

Amended: Final Rule (123 KB) based on Significant Analysis (370 KB)
Effective: Nov. 2, 2008
Approved Conditions: Added Crohn’s disease, Hepatitis C with debilitating nausea or intractable pain, diseases, including anorexia, which result in nausea, vomiting, wasting, appetite loss, cramping, seizures, muscle spasms, or spasticity, when those conditions are unrelieved by standard treatments or medications.

Possession/Cultivation: A qualifying patient and designated provider may possess a total of no more than twenty-four ounces of usable marijuana, and no more than fifteen plants. This quantity became the state’s official “60-day supply” on Nov. 2, 2008.

[Editor’s Note: On Jan. 21, 2010, the Supreme Court of the State of Washington ruled that Ballot Initiative “I-692 did not legalize marijuana, but rather provided an authorized user with an affirmative defense if the user shows compliance with the requirements for medical marijuana possession.” State v. Fry (125 KB)

ProCon.org contacted the Washington Department of Health to ask whether it had received any instructions in light of this ruling. Kristi Weeks, Director of Policy and Legislation, stated the following in a Jan. 25, 2010 email response to ProCon.org:

“The Department of Health has a limited role related to medical marijuana in the state of Washington. Specifically, we were directed by the Legislature to determine the amount of a 60 day supply and conduct a study of issues related to access to medical marijuana. Both of these tasks have been completed. We have maintained the medical marijuana webpage for the convenience of the public.

The department has not received ‘any instructions’ in light of State v. Fry. That case does not change the law or affect the 60 day supply. Chapter 69.51A RCW, as confirmed in Fry, provides an affirmative defense to prosecution for possession of marijuana for qualifying patients and caregivers.”]

Amended: SB 5073 (375 KB)
Effective: July 22, 2011
Gov. Christine Gregoire signed sections of the bill and partially vetoed others, as explained in the Apr. 29, 2011 veto notice. (50 KB) Gov. Gregoire struck down sections related to creating state-licensed medical marijuana dispensaries and a voluntary patient registry.

[Editor’s Note: On Nov. 6, 2012, Washington voters passed Initiative 502, which allows the state to “license and regulate marijuana production, distribution, and possession for persons over 21 and tax marijuana sales.” The website for Washington’s medical marijuana program states that the intiative “does not amend or repeal the medical marijuana laws (chapter 69.51A RCW) in any way. The laws relating to authorization of medical marijuana by healthcare providers are still valid and enforceable.”]


Oregon: DEA Seizes Medical Marijuana Patient Records For Federal Investigation | Hemp News


The fears of some medical marijuana patients that state patient registries could be used against them appear, unfortunately, to have been well-founded. A federal search warrant forced the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program (OMMP) to hand over patient records, according to recently discovered court papers.

via Oregon: DEA Seizes Medical Marijuana Patient Records For Federal Investigation | Hemp News.

Oregon Lawmakers Approve Measure to Legalize Marijuana – TheJointBlog


April 2, 2013

by TheJointBlog

Today Oregon’s House Judiciary Committee held a public hearing to discuss House Bill 3371, and approved the measure with a 6-4 vote, sgir-046ending it to House Revenue Committee. The measure, titled the Control, Regulation and Taxation of Cannabis Act, would legalize the personal cultivation of up to 6 plants, and the personal possession of up to 24 ounces for adults, while establishing state-licensed retail outlets to sell cannabis.

The measure, which would also explicitly legalize hemp, would take effect on July 1st, 2014.

via Oregon Lawmakers Approve Measure to Legalize Marijuana – TheJointBlog.